Researchers trace geologic origins of Gulf of Mexico ‘super basin’ success

The Gulf of Mexico holds huge untapped offshore oil deposits that could help power the U.S. for decades. According to researchers, the basin's vast...

Climate change-fueled drought drives Sri Lanka’s farmers to cities.

“Farmers are moving because there isn’t enough money in agriculture,” officials admitBy Amantha Perera COLOMBO, Nov 2 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - When Siri Hettige, a...

Honeybees are struggling to get enough good bacteria

Modern monoculture farming, commercial forestry and even well-intentioned gardeners could be making it harder for honeybees to store food and fight off diseases, a...

Patterns of income and urbanization impact mammal biodiversity in the concrete jungle

New research suggests that while there is an association between income and diversity of medium to large mammals, another factor is stronger: 'urban intensity',...

Researchers prove fish-friendly detection method more sensitive than electrofishing

Delivering a minor electric shock into a stream to reveal any fish lurking nearby may be the gold standard for detecting fish populations, but...

Past global photosynthesis reacted quickly to more carbon in the air

Ice cores allow climate researchers to look 800,000 years back in time: atmospheric carbon acts as fertilizer, increasing biological production. The mechanism removes carbon...

New way to reduce food waste

In a society that equates beauty with quality, the perception that blemished produce is less desirable than its perfect peers contributes to 1.3 billion...

Warmer winters could lead to longer blue crab season in Chesapeake Bay

Scientists are predicting that warmer winters in the Chesapeake Bay will likely lead to longer and more productive seasons for Maryland's favorite summer crustacean,...

A tasty Florida butterfly turns sour

A 15-year study by entomologists found that, when living apart from the unsavory bug it mimics, the viceroy butterfly becomes yucky, making biologists rethink...

Rapid pollution increases may be as harmful to the heart as absolute levels

Rapid increases in pollution may be as harmful to the heart as sustained high levels, according to new research. The authors urgently call for...

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Reasons for Japan to dump nuclear power more obvious now than ever.

It has been nearly six years since the triple-meltdown at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant. Two things seem symbolic of this time: the...

Pruitt's political friends come to lobby.

Glenn Coffee and Crystal Coon, both associates from U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's political days in Oklahoma, have registered to lobby in Washington. Photo...

Hydrology: Increasing river flood risk

Earth's Future http://doi.org/bzpc (2017) GARY DYSON / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO The hydrological cycle is predicted to strengthen with global warming, increasing the amount and intensity of...

Cosumnes River provides model for floodplain restoration in California.

With California’s surface drought over, the state can prioritize investing in groundwater recharge and floodplain restoration to help fight one of its biggest lingering...

Cold-water corals: Acidification harms, warming promotes growth

The cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa is able to counteract negative effects of ocean acidification under controlled laboratory conditions when water temperature rises by a...