Why big animals can't take a little rain.

Melting from glaciers and permafrost was not kind to the large animals of the last Ice Age. The persistent moisture turned grasslands into peatlands and...

Diverse tropical forests grow fast despite widespread phosphorus limitation

Ecological theory says that poor soils limit the productivity of tropical forests, but adding nutrients as fertilizer rarely increases tree growth, suggesting that productivity...

Shale natural gas development impacting recreationists

Researchers took a closer look at shale natural gas energy development (SGD) and how it is affecting the experiences of outdoor recreationists, like hikers...

Release of nutrients from lake-bottom sediments worsens Lake Erie’s annual ‘dead zone’

Robotic laboratories on the bottom of Lake Erie have revealed that the muddy sediments there release nearly as much of the nutrient phosphorus into...

EU says to beef up climate diplomacy to save Paris agreement

BRUSSELS EU foreign ministers on Monday said the bloc would strengthen diplomacy to promote the fight against climate change in the face of a...

VIDEO: 'Difficult slog' ahead to undo Obama climate legacy, says former EPA chief.

JUDY WOODRUFF: And now let’s hear from the prior administrator of the EPA, who essentially led much of President Obama’s efforts during his second...

The carbon footprint of crime has fallen, study finds

A study has found that the carbon footprint of crime over the last 20 years has fallen.

Publisher Correction: Measuring progress from nationally determined contributions to mid-century strategies

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When it comes to regrowing tails, neural stem cells are the key

It's a longstanding mystery why salamanders can perfectly regenerate their tails whereas lizard tails grow back all wrong. By transplanting neural stem cells between...

Faint foreshocks foretell California quakes

New research mining data from a catalog of more than 1.8 million southern California earthquakes found that nearly three-fourths of the time, foreshocks signalled...

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Berlin plans a new network of bike superhighways.

Twenty years ago, Berlin’s network of sidewalk paths marked it out as one of Europe’s best places to ride a bike. But as the...

Guest post: Deciphering the rise and fall of Antarctic sea ice extent

The sharp decline in Arctic sea ice over recent decades has become one of the most enduring images of the Earth’s warming climate. Yet,...

Canada's climate change policies keep its Paris commitments out of reach.

Canada probably will fail to meet its international commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions under even the best-case scenario, according to a new report...

Vacancy: Science writer at Carbon Brief

An exciting opportunity to become Carbon Brief’s new science writer, helping us to analyse and report climate change and society’s response to it. Do you...

Canary in the kelp forest: Sea creature dissolves in today’s warming, acidic waters

The one-two punch of warming waters and ocean acidification is predisposing some marine animals to dissolving quickly under conditions already occurring off the Northern...